Colorado Climate Center
Colorado State University

Colorado Drought Status Briefing

·Current Briefing

·Archives

·Attend a future webinar

 

 



List of Available News Releases

To update you on the latest Climate Center activities, news releases are occasionally prepared. These include those from the media and our own distributions through Colorado State University. These are provided below.

Click on the link(s) below to read the Press or News Release.

Press Releases:

Colorado State University Press Releases:

  • April 25, 2007
    NOAA bestows 'Environmental Hero' award on CSU researcher and state climatologist Nolan Doesken
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration recently honored Nolan Doesken, state climatologist at Colorado State University, as one of 10 "Environmental Heroes" for creating an amateur precipitation monitoring network that has 4,000 volunteers nationally - and which continues to grow.
  • January, 2007
    CoCoRaHS in atmospheric science expands nationally with NOAA grant
    Colorado State University's popular precipitation monitoring program, CoCoRaHS (the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network), is making its first formal push to expand nationally thanks to a recent educational grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
  • January 4, 2007
    Fort Collins ends year with respectable 11.2 inches of precipitation, State Climatologist says
    The snowstorms that ended 2006 improved Fort Collins' annual precipitation total to 11.2 inches - a respectable amount, but still nearly four inches below average, said Nolan Doesken, state climatologist and senior research associate at Colorado State University.
  • Wednesday, April 28, 2004
    COLORADO STATE'S COCO RAHS NEEDS DENVER-AREA WEATHER WATCHERS TO HELP MAKE COMMUNITY DROUGHT, WATER USE DECISIONS
    Colorado State University's Community Collaborative Rain and Hail Study, or CoCo RaHS, is recruiting hundreds of weather-watching volunteers to improve precipitation monitoring throughout the seven-county Denver-Metro area before the onset of potentially serious summer drought conditions in the state. CoCo RaHS provides detailed drought and other water decision-making information to municipalities, home owners, industry, agriculture, utility providers, resource managers and educators. CoCo RaHS information is updated daily and available for free public access on the Web at www.cocorahs.org.
  • Tuesday, April 01, 2003
    ACCORDING TO CLIMATE CENTER, RECENT STORMS ARE DROUGHT-EASING, NOT DROUGHT-ENDING: STATE BEHIND IN RESERVOIR STORAGE AND ACCUMULATIONS
    Amid varying reports of Colorado's current drought situation and water supply outlook following the March blizzard of 2003, climatologists at Colorado State University's Colorado Climate Center stress that recent rain and snowfall, although beneficial in easing the state's drought, are not enough to end the state's drought. The climate researchers add that, even with a wetter than average spring, it is not likely that Colorado will pull out of long-term drought impacts in 2003, and that the state will continue to face serious irrigation and municipal water shortages throughout the spring and summer.
  • Thursday, February 13, 2003
    FORUM ADDRESSES WATER CRUNCH, PROBABILITY OF DRY YEARS AHEAD

    Although much of Colorado has received snowfall in the last few weeks, drought conditions still exist. In fact, Colorado State University's Colorado Climate Center's warning this week of an increasing threat of an exceptionally dry winter and the high probability of at least another year of drought will be among topics discussed at the Colorado Agricultural Outlook Forum Feb. 20 at the Renaissance Denver Hotel, 3801 Quebec St.
  • Monday, February 10, 2003
    STATE CLIMATOLOGIST WARNS OF GROWING THREATS FOR A DRY WINTER AND A SERIOUS MULTI-YEAR DROUGHT

    Snowfall in Colorado's high country and along portions of the Front Range recently added moisture to the state, however, researchers from Colorado State University's Colorado Climate Center warn about the increasing threat of an exceptionally dry winter. The climatologists report that Colorado is currently experiencing a serious two-year state-wide drought and headed toward a multi-year drought. They add that the state's water managers and citizens should prepare for ongoing serious drought conditions at least throughout 2003.
  • Thursday, January 23, 2003
    COLORADO STATE’S POPULAR RAIN AND HAIL STUDY PROGRAM IS LOOKING FOR WEATHER-LOVING VOLUNTEERS AT THE COLORADO FARM SHOW

    Representatives from Colorado State University's Community Collaborative Rain and Hail Study, or CoCoRaHS, will be showing Colorado's agricultural community how to use valuable data from the statewide weather observing network at the 39th Annual Colorado Farm Show Jan. 28-30 at the Island Grove
  • Wednesday, January 15, 2003
    MEDIA TIP SHEET: DROUGHT-RELATED EXPERTS AND RESOURCES AT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY

    Robert Ward, director of the Water Center at Colorado State University and director of the Colorado Water Resources Research Institute, is available to discuss drought and related municipal water management and water quality monitoring issues. Ward also can address wastewater treatment, non-point source pollution control and water systems engineering and design. Ward has co-authored two books about water management and currently serves on The National Water Quality Monitoring Council and consults around the world on water quality monitoring issues. To speak with Ward, contact Brad Bohlander at (970) 491-1545 or brad.bohlander@colostate.edu.
  • Wednesday, November 27, 2002
    COLORADO STATE’S DROUGHTLAB WELCOMES WATER MANAGERS, PUBLIC OFFICIALS AND RESEARCHERS TO THE COLORADO DROUGHT CONFERENCE

    Colorado State University's DroughtLab is hosting the Colorado Drought Conference: Managing Water Supply and Demand in the Time of Drought from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Dec. 4 at the Lory Student Center on the university's main campus. The conference, being attended by water managers, public officials and leading water and climate researchers, will analyze current water management issues and examine options to mitigate negative impacts of drought for the future.
  • Tuesday, November 12, 2002
    FINAL 2002 DROUGHT UPDATE: WET WEATHER BRINGS RELIEF, BUT DROUGHT FAR FROM OVER - STATE NEEDS TO PREPARE FOR MORE YEARS OF DROUGHT

    Although widespread snowfall in Colorado's high country recently has added significant amounts of moisture across the state, researchers from Colorado State University's Colorado Climate Center warn that the effects from one of the hottest, driest years in state history are far from over.
  • Thursday, September 26, 2002
    SEPTEMBER DROUGHT UPDATE: RAIN AND SNOW BRING SOME STATEWIDE RELIEF: HOWEVER, DROUGHT UNLIKELY TO SUBSIDE BY SPRING

    The last few weeks have brought the closest thing to statewide drought relief that Coloradoans have seen this year as rain fell throughout the state accompanied by cool temperatures, high humidity's and the first high elevation snow of the season. However, even with a wet fall and above average snowfall this winter, experts at Colorado State University's Colorado Climate Center warn that the resources for most water users will not likely recover from the drought by next spring.
  • Tuesday, September 10, 2002
    MEDIA TIPSHEET: DROUGHT AND WILDFIRE

    Economic impacts of drought still being assessedThe economic impacts of the drought are starting to be tallied as dismal crops are harvested from fields and ranchers scramble to keep their herds fed. Jeff Tranel is a Colorado State Cooperative Extension agricultural economist who is also a member of Governor Owens' Drought Task Force, a group of experts who keep the governor apprised of the drought conditions and its effects. Tranel can discuss the economic significance of the drought in Colorado and the west, how the impact will be assessed, the role of government in dealing with drought, and challenges agriculture and other industries are facing. To speak with Tranel, contact Dell Rae Moellenberg at 970-491-6009 or dellrae.moellenberg@colostate.edu.
  • Tuesday, September 03, 2002
    COLORADO STATE RESEARCHERS CREATE DROUGHT LAB, TAKE LEADERSHIP ROLE IN PROVIDING DROUGHT-RELATED INFORMATION

    As Colorado's drought worsens, the state's water supplies diminish and entire communities are left uncertain about how to deal with prolonged dry conditions, Colorado State University researchers are responding by establishing DroughtLab.
  • Wednesday, August 28, 2002
    AUGUST DROUGHT UPDATE: FALL WEATHER PATTERNS MAY BRING COMBO OF MOISTURE AND HOT, DRY, WINDY DAYS TO THIRSTY STATE

    Fall weather patterns may bring limited relief to Colorado's thirst for moisture, but experts at the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University warn that enough fall moisture to make a significant difference to the drought-ridden state is unlikely.
  • Monday, July 22, 2002
    JULY DROUGHT UPDATE: MONSOON SEASON COULD LESSEN IMPACTS OF SUMMER DROUGHT; FLASH FLOODING BECOMES A MAJOR CONCERN

    As Colorado's drought conditions worsen and the state's water supplies continue to diminish, climate researchers at the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University note that some limited relief may be in sight.
  • Thursday, July 18, 2002
    MEDIA TIPSHEET - DROUGHT AND FIRE

    The economic impacts of the drought are starting to be tallied as dismal crops are harvested from fields and ranchers scramble to keep their herds fed. Jeff Tranel is a Colorado State Cooperative Extension agricultural economist who is also a member of Governor Owens' Drought Task Force, a group of experts who keep the governor apprised of the drought conditions and its effects. Tranel can discuss the economic significance of the drought in Colorado and the west, how the impact will be assessed, the role of government in dealing with drought, and challenges agriculture and other industries are facing. To speak with Tranel, contact Dell Rae Moellenberg at 970-491-6009 or dellrae.moellenberg@colostate.edu.
  • Thursday, June 20, 2002
    JUNE DROUGHT UPDATE: COLORADO’S DROUGHT AND WATER SHORTAGES COULD BE THE WORST IN 25 YEARS

    According to researchers at the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University, the state could witness water shortages this year unlike anything residents have experienced in 25 years.
  • Tuesday, June 11, 2002
    COAGMET WEATHER NETWORK REDUCES IMPACT OF DROUGHT, HELPS ENSURE BEST FROM STATE’S $15 BILLION AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY

    Weather conditions affect nearly every aspect of Colorado's $15 billion agriculture business, the state's third largest industry. Without accurate data to support strategic farm planning, severe weather periods could potentially destroy the bulk of Colorado's crops, reducing food supplies and seriously damaging the state's economy.
  • Friday, May 17, 2002
    MAY DROUGHT UPDATE: SNOWPACK, STREAMFLOW AND WATER STORAGE AT LOW LEVELS AND EXPECTED TO DECREASE

    According to researchers at the Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University, the state's snowpack, streamflow and reservoir storage continue to decrease while the statewide fire danger is increasing.
  • Friday, May 17, 2002
    MEDIA TIP SHEET: DROUGHT AND FIRE

    Drought has been declared in more than 30 states in the union, with several additional states labeled official drought watch areas. Forecasters are calling for a long, hot summer ahead and spell out an extreme fire season and financial trouble for many industries. The following is a list of Colorado State University drought and fire experts who are available to the media. This list also includes contact information for university research centers. This tip sheet is intended to provide resources to the media and is not intended to provide contact information for the public. University Relations contacts who can arrange interviews or provide additional information are listed with each expert.
  • Monday, April 15, 2002
    APRIL DROUGHT UPDATE: NEW COLORADO STATE WEB SITE PROVIDES UPDATED DROUGHT AND WEATHER-RELATED INFORMATION

    The Colorado Climate Center at Colorado State University has posted a new Web site at http://ccc.atmos.colostate.edu that provides access to current drought data and other weather-related information. In coordination with updates to the site, state climatologist and professor of atmospheric sciences Roger Pielke and research associate Nolan Doesken will issue mid-month Colorado drought advisories throughout the spring and summer.
  • Tuesday, April 09, 2002
    MEDIA TIP SHEET: DROUGHT

    Colorado State Climate Center hub of drought information
  • Monday, June 21, 1999
    COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY APPOINTS ATMOSPHERIC SCIENTIST AS NEW STATE CLIMATOLOGIST; WILL HEAD COLORADO CLIMATE CENTER

    Roger Pielke Sr., professor of atmospheric science at Colorado State University, has been named the new state climatologist for a four-year term.

Other Press Releases:


Mailing Address:
Colorado Climate Center
Dept. of Atmospheric Science
1371 Campus Delivery
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO 80523-1371


Department of Atmospheric ScienceColorado State University
Equal Opportunity StatementDisclaimer Statement
© Colorado Climate Center 2010. All rights reserved.
No portion of this site may be copied or reproduced without express written permission.
Contact: Colorado Climate Center.